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SF buildings and spaces designed by female architects

San Francisco has a myriad of notable projects designed by women, including the Heart Building facade and the new Asian Art Museum

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While the field of architecture is—alas—a male-driven industry, that doesn't mean women aren't playing an important role in the field. Here in San Francisco, there are a several notable projects designed by women, including 400 Grove in Hayes Valley and the Julia Morgan Ballroom. Just to name two.

In honor of International Women’s Day, Curbed SF highlighted six projects in San Francisco. Listed in no particular order, see some of the city's best designed museums, homes, schools, and facades—each one designed by a female architect.

Were there any projects left off? Let Curbed know by leaving a comment or emailing the tipline.

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1. Julia Morgan Ballroom

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465 California St
San Francisco, CA 94104

2. San Francisco Ballet

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455 Franklin St
San Francisco, CA 94102

The first building in the country designed exclusively for the use of a ballet company and school, Beverly Willis designed this Hayes Valley staple. Willis used some of the elements of the Neo-Renaissance architectural found in Civic Center, including riffs on rectangular geometry and horizontal tripartite divisions . The result, while contemporary, is a stunning piece for the noted ballet company. Other ballet schools around the country have taken a page from her work on the building creating schools of dance.

3. Asian Art Museum

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200 Larkin St
San Francisco, CA 94102
(415) 581-3500
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4. 400 Grove

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400 Grove St
San Francisco, CA 94102

On a parcel of land once used by the old Central Freeway, Anne Fougeron designed the stunning 400 Grove in Hayes Valley. The striking structure echoes the neighborhood's many Victorians with a contemporary twist. The building boasts 34 condos. It also helped spearhead much-needed growth in the area. Also of note, Marta Fry Landscape Associates helped Fougeron with the bamboo courtyard.

5. 70 Santa Monica

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70 Santa Monica Way
San Francisco, CA 94127

Gertrude Comfort Morrow, in collaboration with her husband, Irving Morrow, created some gorgeous gems in San Francisco's Saint Francis Wood neighborhood. The one at 70 Santa Monica is particularly lovely.

6. The Hearst Building

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5 3rd St
San Francisco, CA 94103

Primarily known for creating the mammoth and iconic Hearst Castle, Julia Morgan also designed many other Hearst projects. According to Hearst Building History, "In 1938, famed architect Julia Morgan was retained by Hearst to complete a remodel of the Hearst Building’s exterior entry way, the lobby on the ground floor and the parapet roof structure. Her work included the installation of a field of 20 cast bronze medallions containing fanciful animals above the front door, the addition of patriotic red white & blue lighting around the medallions, a crest above the front entry, an elaborate and beautiful lobby interior and updated elevator interiors. Her work remains unchanged today and is visible to the passerby."

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1. Julia Morgan Ballroom

465 California St, San Francisco, CA 94104
465 California St
San Francisco, CA 94104

2. San Francisco Ballet

455 Franklin St, San Francisco, CA 94102

The first building in the country designed exclusively for the use of a ballet company and school, Beverly Willis designed this Hayes Valley staple. Willis used some of the elements of the Neo-Renaissance architectural found in Civic Center, including riffs on rectangular geometry and horizontal tripartite divisions . The result, while contemporary, is a stunning piece for the noted ballet company. Other ballet schools around the country have taken a page from her work on the building creating schools of dance.

455 Franklin St
San Francisco, CA 94102

3. Asian Art Museum

200 Larkin St, San Francisco, CA 94102

A post shared by Francesco (@studiostumpo) on

200 Larkin St
San Francisco, CA 94102

4. 400 Grove

400 Grove St, San Francisco, CA 94102

On a parcel of land once used by the old Central Freeway, Anne Fougeron designed the stunning 400 Grove in Hayes Valley. The striking structure echoes the neighborhood's many Victorians with a contemporary twist. The building boasts 34 condos. It also helped spearhead much-needed growth in the area. Also of note, Marta Fry Landscape Associates helped Fougeron with the bamboo courtyard.

400 Grove St
San Francisco, CA 94102

5. 70 Santa Monica

70 Santa Monica Way, San Francisco, CA 94127

Gertrude Comfort Morrow, in collaboration with her husband, Irving Morrow, created some gorgeous gems in San Francisco's Saint Francis Wood neighborhood. The one at 70 Santa Monica is particularly lovely.

70 Santa Monica Way
San Francisco, CA 94127

6. The Hearst Building

5 3rd St, San Francisco, CA 94103
Getty Images

Primarily known for creating the mammoth and iconic Hearst Castle, Julia Morgan also designed many other Hearst projects. According to Hearst Building History, "In 1938, famed architect Julia Morgan was retained by Hearst to complete a remodel of the Hearst Building’s exterior entry way, the lobby on the ground floor and the parapet roof structure. Her work included the installation of a field of 20 cast bronze medallions containing fanciful animals above the front door, the addition of patriotic red white & blue lighting around the medallions, a crest above the front entry, an elaborate and beautiful lobby interior and updated elevator interiors. Her work remains unchanged today and is visible to the passerby."

5 3rd St
San Francisco, CA 94103