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Mapping 19 Iconic Signs that Define San Francisco's Skyline

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San Francisco is filled with remnants of the past, and many of its iconic signs have been around a very long time. Some, like the famous Coca Cola sign, have been updated to modern times (it has LED lights!) Others like the Doggie Head Diner dachshund head at Sloat Avenue are officially local landmarks. We've put together for you a map of the city's 19 most iconic signs, from a van on a stick near Cesar Chavez to the Fisherman's Wharf welcome that appears in nearly every tourist's San Francisco photos. Love a local sign that we missed? Let us know in the comments after the jump.

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Castro Theatre

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This sign, which has been around since the heyday of the Castro movement, is still around and open for business.

View Alcatraz

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This sign on Fisherman's Wharf at one time did have neon to lure tourists to the famous attraction, but now it's dark.

Coca Cola Billboard

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Probably one of the most famous billboards in San Francisco history, in 2010 the entire sign was changed over to energy saving LED lamps after 70 years of service.

The Macy's Sign

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The Macy's sign has seen many better days, but still stands above the Stonestown Galleria in most of its original form, save for a few pigeon nesting holes.

Fisherman's Wharf Sign

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Famous for being in every tourist photo gallery of San Francisco, you're reminded of how much seafood you can eat when you see this sign.

Ghirardelli Square

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One of the largest and most famous signs in the city, the Ghirardelli sign has been around since 1852, making it also one of the oldest.

Hills Bros Sign

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Around since the opening of the Hills Bros plant in 1926, the sign now adorns the top of the Mozilla Corporation headquarters.

Ferry Building

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Part of the replacement for the original structure, the sign was constructed with the new Ferry Building in 1892 and was one of the lone survivors of the 1906 earthquake and fire.

Bell Plumbing Van on a Stick

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If you're ever near Cesar Chavez, look up! There's a van on a stick up there advertising Bell Plumbing.

Huntington Hotel

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Perched at the top of Nob Hill, the Hotel Huntington sign was part of the renovation of the original 1922 apartment complex two years after construction.

One Tree Sign

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This SoMa mural was meant to be a final reminder of nature before viewers entered the industrial city. It was created in 1995 by muralist Rigo 23.

Innercity Home

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Another mural by artist Rigo23, this sign welcomes people into the heart of SoMa and the city.

Coca Cola Bottle

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Another San Francisco ad for Coca Cola, this sign is one of the staples of AT&T park.

Giant Camera

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The camera obscura is one of the surviving pieces of Ocean Beach's long-gone Playland. It was built as an extension to Playland in 1946 and is on the observation deck behind Cliff House.

South San Francisco

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This sign from the 1920s is listed on the National Register of Historic places. The letters range in height from 48 to 65 feet. It was meant to be a civic booster to the city.

Hopper's Hands

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Created for Ken Hopper, an ironworker at the Golden Gate Bridge who spent years saving people from jumping off the bridge.

Controversial Coca Cola Sign

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This vintage Coca-Cola sign caused neighbors to complain and a heated battle ensued through 2011 and 2012. Planning finally approved the restoration of the sign.

Kahn & Keville Sign

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This Tenderloin sign has provided inspirational quotes and funny phrases to passersby since the 1950s. It changes every three to six weeks based on feedback from the community.

Doggie Diner Head

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This is the final Doggie Diner Head sign still standing in San Francisco, although there were once many marking locations of the 1960s chain diner. It's officially a San Francisco landmark and was restored in 2014.

Palace Hotel

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Added in the 1920s, this sign atop the Palace Hotel can be seen from Nob Hill and beyond.

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Castro Theatre

This sign, which has been around since the heyday of the Castro movement, is still around and open for business.

View Alcatraz

This sign on Fisherman's Wharf at one time did have neon to lure tourists to the famous attraction, but now it's dark.

Coca Cola Billboard

Probably one of the most famous billboards in San Francisco history, in 2010 the entire sign was changed over to energy saving LED lamps after 70 years of service.

The Macy's Sign

The Macy's sign has seen many better days, but still stands above the Stonestown Galleria in most of its original form, save for a few pigeon nesting holes.

Fisherman's Wharf Sign

Famous for being in every tourist photo gallery of San Francisco, you're reminded of how much seafood you can eat when you see this sign.

Ghirardelli Square

One of the largest and most famous signs in the city, the Ghirardelli sign has been around since 1852, making it also one of the oldest.

Hills Bros Sign

Around since the opening of the Hills Bros plant in 1926, the sign now adorns the top of the Mozilla Corporation headquarters.

Ferry Building

Part of the replacement for the original structure, the sign was constructed with the new Ferry Building in 1892 and was one of the lone survivors of the 1906 earthquake and fire.

Bell Plumbing Van on a Stick

If you're ever near Cesar Chavez, look up! There's a van on a stick up there advertising Bell Plumbing.

Huntington Hotel

Perched at the top of Nob Hill, the Hotel Huntington sign was part of the renovation of the original 1922 apartment complex two years after construction.

One Tree Sign

This SoMa mural was meant to be a final reminder of nature before viewers entered the industrial city. It was created in 1995 by muralist Rigo 23.

Innercity Home

Another mural by artist Rigo23, this sign welcomes people into the heart of SoMa and the city.

Coca Cola Bottle

Another San Francisco ad for Coca Cola, this sign is one of the staples of AT&T park.

Giant Camera

The camera obscura is one of the surviving pieces of Ocean Beach's long-gone Playland. It was built as an extension to Playland in 1946 and is on the observation deck behind Cliff House.

South San Francisco

This sign from the 1920s is listed on the National Register of Historic places. The letters range in height from 48 to 65 feet. It was meant to be a civic booster to the city.

Hopper's Hands

Created for Ken Hopper, an ironworker at the Golden Gate Bridge who spent years saving people from jumping off the bridge.

Controversial Coca Cola Sign

This vintage Coca-Cola sign caused neighbors to complain and a heated battle ensued through 2011 and 2012. Planning finally approved the restoration of the sign.

Kahn & Keville Sign

This Tenderloin sign has provided inspirational quotes and funny phrases to passersby since the 1950s. It changes every three to six weeks based on feedback from the community.

Doggie Diner Head

This is the final Doggie Diner Head sign still standing in San Francisco, although there were once many marking locations of the 1960s chain diner. It's officially a San Francisco landmark and was restored in 2014.

Palace Hotel

Added in the 1920s, this sign atop the Palace Hotel can be seen from Nob Hill and beyond.