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Mapping 16 Eichlers for sale in the Bay Area

A sweet 16 pack from everyone’s favorite 20th-century developer

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In the years after World War II, developer Joseph Eichler churned out some 11,000 homes in California. In the words of NPR, he “built the suburbs in style.” He also injected architectural vision into California’s home tracts, citing Frank Lloyd Wright as his own inspiration.

Even more than 40 years after his death, Eichler’s name has a cult following (including some intent on living the majority of their lives in his homes) and serves as a byword for the signature style he favored: single-story 20th-century homes with gigantic windows, sloping roofs, long and low-slung profiles, and freedom of mobility between rooms and with outside yards.

Though realtors will often present a listing as a “rare Eichler,” the fact is the Bay Area practically teems with the handiwork of the prolific developer. Here are just 16 of the best of the best that are on the market right now.

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26 Mount Whitney Drive

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This sprawling five-bed, two-bath, 1962 home has been hiding off the market for nearly 20 years. Its nearly 2,000 square feet puts the signature Eichler atrium smack in the middle of the house. Although Eichler’s homes became famous in part for their relative affordability to the middle class, now a place like this can ask more than $1.58 million.

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann, Marin Modern Real Estate

625 Idylberry Road

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Whereas this four-bed, two-bath place from 1957 sports a rambling exterior with some surprisingly small windows that then gives way to an expansive, path-filled garden. Thanks to the drought years, the gardens of NorCal Eichlers now look an awful lot like they’ve been transplanted from his many SoCal homes. $939,000 is the going price on this one.

Courtesy of Joe Bondanza, Golden Gate Sotheby's International Realty

2180 Elderberry Lane

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A clean and serene four-bed, three-bath Marin home now asking $975,000. Realtor Renee Adelmann pushes the period details—the period in this case being 1958—including “Philippine Mahogony walls, globe lights, walls of glass, original cabinetry, and [...] original Japanese style closet doors.”

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann

727 Appleberry Drive

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Just a couple of blocks away another four bed house (with two baths this time) from 1958 appears to be all garage and nothing else from the curb. But that nearly invisible curb profile disguises a brilliant and beautiful atrium with peaked skylights inside. The asking price here: $739,000.

Photo via Tour Factory

21 Ayala Court

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While here’s a four-bed, three-bath 1960 Eichler that’s looking to double its money, selling for just $660,000 in 2015 but now listed for an intimidating $1.35 million after a renovation bumped its midcentury look up into the 21s century.

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann, Marin Modern Real Estate

4136 Sacramento Street

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The ad for this four-bed, two-bath 1963 Eichler claims that its “highly desirable open air atrium” was “limited to only select Eichler models.” The Eichler obsessives over at the Eichler Network have posed the question before whether Eichler’s atriums really qualify as atriums at all, which verges on an existential question.

Photo courtesy of Mona Koussa, eHomeSurf,

999 Green Street

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But probably most famous is the Eichler building at 999 Green Street, a towering affair dubbed the Summit. Several homes here have come up in 2017, including a one-two pair on the 22nd floor for $2.1 million.

Photo courtesy of Craig Ackerman

66 Clearly Court

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Let it not be said that Eichler was a one-trick pony. Though famous now for his single-story homes (with occasional two-story mutations when space demanded it), he had his hand in several larger multi-family buildings in the city as well, designed by Jones & Emmons. Right now four three-bed, two-bath condos in the building are for sale for between $875K and $1.09 million.

Photo courtesy of Cleary Court

190 Amber Drive

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But there’s still room for a classic Eichler home in the city--quite a lot of room, as it turns out, in the firm of a four-bed, two-and-a-half bath, 2,500-square-foot 1962 offering asking $1.79 million. Bonus: It’s a rare two-story offering.

Photo courtesy of Lamisse Droubi, Compass

5954 Greenridge Road

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This Greenridge road neighbor repeat the mid-roof peak motif but continue it across the entire house, even giving way to a peaked atrium opening in the middle of the five-bed, two-bath 1963 pad now angling for $1.15 million.

Photo courtesy of Ela Strong, BHHS Drysdale

5877 Highwood Road

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There’s something very jaunty and almost defiant about that single peak in the roof above the entryway, as if this five-bed, two-bath house from 1962 is putting its all into one big statement to avoid being overlooked. Although it’s among the most old-fashioned of the present crop of Eichlers and the decor needs attention, it still vies for a $1 million asking price.

Photo by courtesy Henry Gannett, Park Place

239 Argonaut Avenue

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One of Eichler’s notable contributions to San Francisco proper is this track of double-decker brick homes from 1962 in Visitacion Valley that cluster into a kind of miniature neighborhood in themselves. This latest four-bed, two-and-a-half bath offering listed for $688,000, with an offer currently pending. Which means that, yes, strangely enough, the city itself offers some of the most affordable Eichler homes in the region. Who knew?

Photo courtesy of Trent Zhu, BHG J.F. Finnegan Realtors

5392 Crown Court

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The streets address is a particularly lucky break for this three-bed, two-bath 1960 home, as the glow in the windows from the rear of the house does indeed put one in mind of a glittering crown when lit up at night. The front offers a much more reserved shingled set-up. The royal price set in April was just over $1 million, and an offer is pending but hasn’t finalized for several weeks.

Photo courtesy of Thomas Westfall, Alain Pinel

2058 Edgewood Drive

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How fast does an Eichler appreciate? This four-bed, two-bath Palo Alto property from 1956 tripled its money the last time it was on the market, taking $1.2 million in 2006, up from $385,000 in 1992 (although that’s about $685K after inflation). Its present $2.59 million is by comparison less ambitious.

Photo courtesy of Jim and Jimmy NappoAlain Pinel Realtors

3433 Kenneth Drive

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The latest ad for this four-bed, two-and-a-half bath, dual-level shingled 1957 home doesn’t mention its Eichler pedigree, but Eichler enthusiast Mark Easterday at Eichler Homes has it tagged as one of Joe’s. For $2.45 million, probably a good idea to get it in writing.

Photo courtesy of Annette Smith, Sotheby’s

4046 Ben Lomond Drive

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Here’s a three-bed, two-bath 1955 Eichler that promotes its interiors as both “timeless” but also “renovated,” which seems contradictory. But as the existence of mid-century architecture in suburbs in the first place illustrates, there’s no holding back progress. Hence the $2.39 million price.

Photo courtesy of Timothy Foy, Midtown Realty

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26 Mount Whitney Drive

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann, Marin Modern Real Estate

This sprawling five-bed, two-bath, 1962 home has been hiding off the market for nearly 20 years. Its nearly 2,000 square feet puts the signature Eichler atrium smack in the middle of the house. Although Eichler’s homes became famous in part for their relative affordability to the middle class, now a place like this can ask more than $1.58 million.

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann, Marin Modern Real Estate

625 Idylberry Road

Courtesy of Joe Bondanza, Golden Gate Sotheby's International Realty

Whereas this four-bed, two-bath place from 1957 sports a rambling exterior with some surprisingly small windows that then gives way to an expansive, path-filled garden. Thanks to the drought years, the gardens of NorCal Eichlers now look an awful lot like they’ve been transplanted from his many SoCal homes. $939,000 is the going price on this one.

Courtesy of Joe Bondanza, Golden Gate Sotheby's International Realty

2180 Elderberry Lane

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann

A clean and serene four-bed, three-bath Marin home now asking $975,000. Realtor Renee Adelmann pushes the period details—the period in this case being 1958—including “Philippine Mahogony walls, globe lights, walls of glass, original cabinetry, and [...] original Japanese style closet doors.”

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann

727 Appleberry Drive

Photo via Tour Factory

Just a couple of blocks away another four bed house (with two baths this time) from 1958 appears to be all garage and nothing else from the curb. But that nearly invisible curb profile disguises a brilliant and beautiful atrium with peaked skylights inside. The asking price here: $739,000.

Photo via Tour Factory

21 Ayala Court

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann, Marin Modern Real Estate

While here’s a four-bed, three-bath 1960 Eichler that’s looking to double its money, selling for just $660,000 in 2015 but now listed for an intimidating $1.35 million after a renovation bumped its midcentury look up into the 21s century.

Photo courtesy of Renee Adelmann, Marin Modern Real Estate

4136 Sacramento Street

Photo courtesy of Mona Koussa, eHomeSurf,

The ad for this four-bed, two-bath 1963 Eichler claims that its “highly desirable open air atrium” was “limited to only select Eichler models.” The Eichler obsessives over at the Eichler Network have posed the question before whether Eichler’s atriums really qualify as atriums at all, which verges on an existential question.

Photo courtesy of Mona Koussa, eHomeSurf,

999 Green Street

Photo courtesy of Craig Ackerman

But probably most famous is the Eichler building at 999 Green Street, a towering affair dubbed the Summit. Several homes here have come up in 2017, including a one-two pair on the 22nd floor for $2.1 million.

Photo courtesy of Craig Ackerman

66 Clearly Court

Photo courtesy of Cleary Court

Let it not be said that Eichler was a one-trick pony. Though famous now for his single-story homes (with occasional two-story mutations when space demanded it), he had his hand in several larger multi-family buildings in the city as well, designed by Jones & Emmons. Right now four three-bed, two-bath condos in the building are for sale for between $875K and $1.09 million.

Photo courtesy of Cleary Court

190 Amber Drive

Photo courtesy of Lamisse Droubi, Compass

But there’s still room for a classic Eichler home in the city--quite a lot of room, as it turns out, in the firm of a four-bed, two-and-a-half bath, 2,500-square-foot 1962 offering asking $1.79 million. Bonus: It’s a rare two-story offering.

Photo courtesy of Lamisse Droubi, Compass

5954 Greenridge Road

Photo courtesy of Ela Strong, BHHS Drysdale

This Greenridge road neighbor repeat the mid-roof peak motif but continue it across the entire house, even giving way to a peaked atrium opening in the middle of the five-bed, two-bath 1963 pad now angling for $1.15 million.

Photo courtesy of Ela Strong, BHHS Drysdale

5877 Highwood Road

Photo by courtesy Henry Gannett, Park Place

There’s something very jaunty and almost defiant about that single peak in the roof above the entryway, as if this five-bed, two-bath house from 1962 is putting its all into one big statement to avoid being overlooked. Although it’s among the most old-fashioned of the present crop of Eichlers and the decor needs attention, it still vies for a $1 million asking price.

Photo by courtesy Henry Gannett, Park Place

239 Argonaut Avenue

Photo courtesy of Trent Zhu, BHG J.F. Finnegan Realtors

One of Eichler’s notable contributions to San Francisco proper is this track of double-decker brick homes from 1962 in Visitacion Valley that cluster into a kind of miniature neighborhood in themselves. This latest four-bed, two-and-a-half bath offering listed for $688,000, with an offer currently pending. Which means that, yes, strangely enough, the city itself offers some of the most affordable Eichler homes in the region. Who knew?

Photo courtesy of Trent Zhu, BHG J.F. Finnegan Realtors

5392 Crown Court

Photo courtesy of Thomas Westfall, Alain Pinel

The streets address is a particularly lucky break for this three-bed, two-bath 1960 home, as the glow in the windows from the rear of the house does indeed put one in mind of a glittering crown when lit up at night. The front offers a much more reserved shingled set-up. The royal price set in April was just over $1 million, and an offer is pending but hasn’t finalized for several weeks.

Photo courtesy of Thomas Westfall, Alain Pinel

2058 Edgewood Drive

Photo courtesy of Jim and Jimmy NappoAlain Pinel Realtors

How fast does an Eichler appreciate? This four-bed, two-bath Palo Alto property from 1956 tripled its money the last time it was on the market, taking $1.2 million in 2006, up from $385,000 in 1992 (although that’s about $685K after inflation). Its present $2.59 million is by comparison less ambitious.

Photo courtesy of Jim and Jimmy NappoAlain Pinel Realtors

3433 Kenneth Drive

Photo courtesy of Annette Smith, Sotheby’s

The latest ad for this four-bed, two-and-a-half bath, dual-level shingled 1957 home doesn’t mention its Eichler pedigree, but Eichler enthusiast Mark Easterday at Eichler Homes has it tagged as one of Joe’s. For $2.45 million, probably a good idea to get it in writing.

Photo courtesy of Annette Smith, Sotheby’s

4046 Ben Lomond Drive

Photo courtesy of Timothy Foy, Midtown Realty

Here’s a three-bed, two-bath 1955 Eichler that promotes its interiors as both “timeless” but also “renovated,” which seems contradictory. But as the existence of mid-century architecture in suburbs in the first place illustrates, there’s no holding back progress. Hence the $2.39 million price.

Photo courtesy of Timothy Foy, Midtown Realty