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The Haight/Ashbury street signs, near the famous window legs. Shutterstock

How San Francisco streets got their names

Every street and avenue has a story to tell, some stranger than others

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Street names can be tricky business in a city like San Francisco; for example, right now the residents of a nameless Upper Market alley are fighting to get a name—any name—conferred on their longtime avenue of residence, unofficially known as John’s Way.

Most of San Francisco’s most prominent streets are named for local leaders, national historical figures, and monumental landmarks. But sometimes even a particularly shrewd and hardworking milkman or con artist can end up immortalized on SF street signage.

Here’s a tour of the sometimes surprising histories behind some of San Francisco’s most and least remarked upon avenues.

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1. Lombard Street

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Lombard St
San Francisco, CA 94133

According to the tourism site SF Travel, Lombard Street is named after a street in Philadelphia, although it’s also possible that a now-absent street in New York was the original namesake.

2. Green Street

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Green St
San Francisco, CA

According to historian Nancy Leek, wealthy Gold Rush-era businessman Talbot H. Green was actually Pennsylvania scofflaw Paul Geddes, who fled to California to escape charges of embezzlement. In a Great Gatsby-esque stroke, so pronounced was Geddes’ local esteem that even after being found out, his respected faux identity ended up on street signs instead of his besmirched real one.

3. Grant Avenue

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Grant Ave
San Francisco, CA

After the Civil War, the city named this critical Chinatown byway for Union general and President Ulysses S. Grant, but in the neighborhood’s earliest days it had been Dupont Street, christened for Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont, instrumental to seizing California in the Mexican-American War. Like Grant, Du Pont later served the Union in the Civil War.

4. Van Ness Avenue

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Van Ness Ave
San Francisco, CA

James Van Ness was mayor of San Francisco from 1855 to 1856. He stepped down after the city and county merged into one body, an act which briefly retired the office of mayor.

5. Polk Street

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Polk St
San Francisco, CA

 U.S. Pesident James K. Polk presided over the Mexican-American War. At the time this burnished his legacy quite a bit, but these days it remains another one of those awkward bits of history people mostly ignore. Even so, Polk secured California for the United States and changed San Francisco and the country’s destinies forever.

6. Hyde Street

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Hyde St
San Francisco, CA

George Hyde was the third alcalde (mayor) of Yerba Buena. According to Hyde’s 1890 obituary in the San Francisco Call, “the place at that time contained a population of about 200.”

7. Gough Street

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Gough St
San Francisco, CA

Rather than a president, alcalde, or land baron, Gough Street was named after a milkman. According to the SF Virtual Museum, Charles Gough had his confounding name (pronounced like “cough”) immortalized the most direct way possible: by serving on an 1855 committee conferring new names on SF streets. Respect the hustle.

8. Octavia Street

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Octavia St
San Francisco, CA

By the way, Charles Gough had a sister named Octavia. 

9. Fillmore Street

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Fillmore St
San Francisco, CA

Named for Millard Fillmore, the former U.S. president who admitted California into the Union. Fillmore was also the last U.S. president from the Whig party, which disbanded at the end of his term.

10. Geary Boulevard

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John W. Geary served as San Francisco’s first mayor and last alcalde. Continuing the mysterious relationship betwen San Francisco street names and Pennsylvania, Geary later served as governor of that state.

11. Howard Street

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Howard St
San Francisco, CA

William Davis Merry Howard served on San Francisco’s very first city council. Unfortunately, he also established one of the city’s earliest vigilante gangs, which is interesting given Howard Street’s rough and tumble reputation in the past.

12. Point Lobos Avenue

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Point Lobos Ave
San Francisco, CA 94121

Spanish explorers named Point Lobos after the barking of nearby sea lions, which they compared to wolves.

13. Golden Gate Avenue

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Golden Gate Ave
San Francisco, CA

In 1846, John C. Fremont looked upon the opening to San Francisco Bay and dubbed it “a golden gate to trade with the Orient.” In records submitted to the U.S. Senate in 1848, Fremont wrote, “To this gate I gave the name of ‘Chrysopylae’ or ‘Golden Gate’ for the same reasons that the harbor of Byzantium was called Chrysoceras, or Golden Horn.”

14. Ivy Street

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Ivy St
San Francisco, CA

The Hayes Valley convention was to name large central streets after prominent locals and to name smaller byways after botanical themes.

15. Hayes Street

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Hayes St
San Francisco, CA

Hayes Street may be named for any of a few members of the wealthy Hayes family, but 19th century politician Samuel Lupton wrote in the San Francisco Call in 1901 that the most likely namesake was Thomas Hayes, who owned much of the land around here in the 19th century, and thus the region was known as Hayes Valley.

16. Fulton Street

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Fulton St
San Francisco, CA

Local historian John Freeman says that Fulton Street bears the name of Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamship, making SF one of at least three California cities with streets in his name.

17. Market Street

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Market St
San Francisco, CA

Odds are Market Street was named after a street of the same name in Pennsylvania, because the engineer behind the 1847 city survey, Jasper O’Farrell, hailed from there. O’Farrell, of course, ended up with a San Francisco street of his own in due time.

18. Funston Avenue

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Funston Ave
San Francisco, CA

Funston should be 13th Avenue but that would be bad luck, so instead it’s named for Brigadier General Frederick Funston, acting commander of the U.S. Army in the days following the 1906 earthquake and eire.

19. Haight Street

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Haight St
San Francisco, CA

Banker Henry Haight came to San Francisco in 1850 and later served as governor. The Library of Congress credits him with founding the University of California, which means that San Francisco’s counterculture hippie movement found its roots in the street named after maybe the biggest square in the history of the state.

According to the Library of Congress, nearby Ashbury Street, forever linked with Haight in the public eye as well as by an actual intersection, is named for Munroe Ashbury, former member of the Board of Supervisors.

20. Terry A. Francois Boulevard

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Terry A Francois Blvd
San Francisco, CA 94158

Originally known as China Basin Street, the city renamed it in 1992 after SF’s first black supervisor, who served from 1964 to 1977. Francois previously made his name as a lawyer successfully suing the San Francisco Housing Authority for discriminatory practices.

21. Duboce Avenue

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Duboce Ave
San Francisco, CA

Spanish-American war veteran Victor Duboce was elected to the Board of Supervisors in 1899, but served less than a year before dying. Moved by his service, his supporters launched a campaign to name Duboce Park for him, which then shortly spread to the street and entire neighborhood. Sometimes you really can win for losing.

22. Irving Street

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Irving St
San Francisco, CA 94122

Classic Americana author Washington Irving is today famous almost exclusively for his long stories The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle.

23. Judah Street

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Judah St
San Francisco, CA 94122

Theodore Judah was chief engineer on the Central Pacific Railroad, although he didn’t always enjoy the degree of fame and acclaim he has today. PBS reports that, in his lifetime, his peers nicknamed him “Crazy Judah” on account of his zeal.

24. Potrero Avenue

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Potrero Ave
San Francisco, CA

“Potrero” simply means “pasture.” Former alcalde Don Francisco de Haro used to graze his cattle around these parts; most of San Francisco was once a literal cowtown.

25. Guerrero Street

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Guerrero St
San Francisco, CA

A common Spanish surname, “Guerrero” means “soldier.” In this case the street is named for another alcalde, Francisco Guerrero. In 1851, Guerrero was “murdered by blows to the head” near 12th Street and Mission. His grave can be found at the Mission itself.

26. Tennessee Street

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Tennessee St
San Francisco, CA

Upon California’s admission to the union in 1850, landowners hoped to set off a patriotic land rush in Potrero Hill by naming the streets for other U.S. states. It didn’t work, but the names stuck anyway.

27. Noe Street

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Noe St
San Francisco, CA

Named for alcalde of Yerba Buena Jose de Jesus Noe. Like many SF neighborhoods, Noe Valley once consisted mostly of a rancho deeded to Noe in 1846.

28. Twin Peaks Boulevard

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Twin Peaks Blvd
San Francisco, CA

According San Francisco Recreation and Parks, the Spanish originally dubbed Twin Peaks “Los Pechos de la Choca”—“the Breasts of the Maiden.”

29. Castro Street

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Castro St
San Francisco, CA

General Jose Castro was several-times governor of various parts of California. Other than having his name conferred on many locales, he seems rarely to have caught a break in life. The onetime lawmaker was often arrested and deposed before falling prey to assassination in 1860.

30. Elizabeth Street

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Elizabeth St
San Francisco, CA

SF Genealogy writes that Noe Valley was once known as Horner’s Addition after landowner James Horner, who bought much of the neighborood from Jose de Jesus Noe in 1853. Horner named Elizabeth Street after his wife, but no street in SF bears his name.

31. Ortega Street

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Ortega St
San Francisco, CA

José Francisco Ortega scouted for Gaspar de Portola (see Portola Drive) and thus was possibly the first European to see the San Francisco Bay.

32. Cesar Chavez

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Cesar Chavez
San Francisco, CA

Until 1995, the street now named for labor leader Cesar Chavez was dubbed Army Street, and some of the signs still bear this moniker beneath the Chavez name. The switch from a short name to a long one meant an enormous bill (just under $1 million) for replacing crucial freeway signage.

33. Martin Avenue

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Martin Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94110

Named for Martin Ron, land surveyor, immigrant, and Holocaust survivor, whose widow spent 13 years pressing the city on the name change.

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34. Taraval Street

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Taraval
San Francisco, CA 94116

Sigismundo Taraval was a Jesuit missionary who traveled through the Baja region in the early 18th century

35. Portola Drive

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Portola Dr
San Francisco, CA

San Francisco technically has two streets named for Gaspar de Portola, who founded both San Diego and Monterey during his 18th century expedition through California.

36. Mission Street

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Mission St
San Francisco, CA

No points for guessing that the Mission Street name stems from Mission Dolores. When the Spanish sent Juan Bautista de Anza to scout for a location for the Mission and Presidio he brought along Father Pedro Font, who deemed the nearby creek Arroyo de Los Dolores—“Stream of Our Lady of the Sorrows,” hence nearby Dolores Street.

37. Innes Avenue

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Innes Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124

Most likely named after 19th century landscape painter George Inness (note the extra “s”). A native of New York, Inness had no particular relationship with San Francisco or California, but his popularity carried him to local honoraries.

38. Quesada Avenue

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Quesada Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124

Jimenez de Quesada was not the luckiest of conquistadors. His disastrous 1569 expedition searching for the fabled lost City of Gold killed all but 80 of his original retinue of 1,800. Quesada himself later died of leprosy.

39. Frida Kahlo Way

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Frida Kahlo Way
San Francisco, CA 94112

Originally named Phelan Avenue, after the family of a racist 19th century mayor and senator, a citizen committee recommended changing the name to honor 20th century artist Frida Kahlo in 2018.

40. Spear Avenue

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Spear Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124

Northern-lying Spear Street is named for enterprising Yerba Buena merchant Nathan Spear, who set up business in the Bay Area in the 1830s and then missed out on the Gold Rush on account of his untimely death in 1849. Whether Spear Avenue is also named for the same Spear is less clear, but several other SF luminaries have multiple streets to their name.

41. Harding Road

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Harding Rd
San Francisco, CA 94132

Such a small and obscure street might not normally bear much scrutiny if not for the fact that it’s named after President Warren G. Harding, widely considered one of, if not the worst presidents in U.S. history and notable in this case because he happened to die in San Francisco at the Palace Hotel in 1923.

42. Excelsior Avenue

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Excelsior Ave
San Francisco, CA 94112

Excelsior neighborhood streets are named for foreign nations and cities, such as Moscow, London, and Persia. Excelsior Avenue was once China Avenue, but during the height of anti-Asian xenophobia in the 19th century the city scrubbed the name, along with Japan and India Avenues.

43. Alemany Boulevard

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Alemany Blvd
San Francisco, CA

The Roman Catholic Church made Joseph Alemany the first Archbishop of San Francisco in 1853. When first appointed Bishop of Monterey three years earlier Alemany tried to back out of it, simply telling the pope “no.” His holiness clarified in a private audience that the assignment to California was not voluntary.

44. Brotherhood Way

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Brotherhood Way
San Francisco, CA 94132

Most likely named for the almost excessive concentration of churches and other houses of worship on this stretch.

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1. Lombard Street

Lombard St, San Francisco, CA 94133

According to the tourism site SF Travel, Lombard Street is named after a street in Philadelphia, although it’s also possible that a now-absent street in New York was the original namesake.

Lombard St
San Francisco, CA 94133

2. Green Street

Green St, San Francisco, CA

According to historian Nancy Leek, wealthy Gold Rush-era businessman Talbot H. Green was actually Pennsylvania scofflaw Paul Geddes, who fled to California to escape charges of embezzlement. In a Great Gatsby-esque stroke, so pronounced was Geddes’ local esteem that even after being found out, his respected faux identity ended up on street signs instead of his besmirched real one.

Green St
San Francisco, CA

3. Grant Avenue

Grant Ave, San Francisco, CA

After the Civil War, the city named this critical Chinatown byway for Union general and President Ulysses S. Grant, but in the neighborhood’s earliest days it had been Dupont Street, christened for Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont, instrumental to seizing California in the Mexican-American War. Like Grant, Du Pont later served the Union in the Civil War.

Grant Ave
San Francisco, CA

4. Van Ness Avenue

Van Ness Ave, San Francisco, CA

James Van Ness was mayor of San Francisco from 1855 to 1856. He stepped down after the city and county merged into one body, an act which briefly retired the office of mayor.

Van Ness Ave
San Francisco, CA

5. Polk Street

Polk St, San Francisco, CA

 U.S. Pesident James K. Polk presided over the Mexican-American War. At the time this burnished his legacy quite a bit, but these days it remains another one of those awkward bits of history people mostly ignore. Even so, Polk secured California for the United States and changed San Francisco and the country’s destinies forever.

Polk St
San Francisco, CA

6. Hyde Street

Hyde St, San Francisco, CA

George Hyde was the third alcalde (mayor) of Yerba Buena. According to Hyde’s 1890 obituary in the San Francisco Call, “the place at that time contained a population of about 200.”

Hyde St
San Francisco, CA

7. Gough Street

Gough St, San Francisco, CA

Rather than a president, alcalde, or land baron, Gough Street was named after a milkman. According to the SF Virtual Museum, Charles Gough had his confounding name (pronounced like “cough”) immortalized the most direct way possible: by serving on an 1855 committee conferring new names on SF streets. Respect the hustle.

Gough St
San Francisco, CA

8. Octavia Street

Octavia St, San Francisco, CA

By the way, Charles Gough had a sister named Octavia. 

Octavia St
San Francisco, CA

9. Fillmore Street

Fillmore St, San Francisco, CA

Named for Millard Fillmore, the former U.S. president who admitted California into the Union. Fillmore was also the last U.S. president from the Whig party, which disbanded at the end of his term.

Fillmore St
San Francisco, CA

10. Geary Boulevard

San Francisco, CA 94109

John W. Geary served as San Francisco’s first mayor and last alcalde. Continuing the mysterious relationship betwen San Francisco street names and Pennsylvania, Geary later served as governor of that state.

11. Howard Street

Howard St, San Francisco, CA

William Davis Merry Howard served on San Francisco’s very first city council. Unfortunately, he also established one of the city’s earliest vigilante gangs, which is interesting given Howard Street’s rough and tumble reputation in the past.

Howard St
San Francisco, CA

12. Point Lobos Avenue

Point Lobos Ave, San Francisco, CA 94121

Spanish explorers named Point Lobos after the barking of nearby sea lions, which they compared to wolves.

Point Lobos Ave
San Francisco, CA 94121

13. Golden Gate Avenue

Golden Gate Ave, San Francisco, CA

In 1846, John C. Fremont looked upon the opening to San Francisco Bay and dubbed it “a golden gate to trade with the Orient.” In records submitted to the U.S. Senate in 1848, Fremont wrote, “To this gate I gave the name of ‘Chrysopylae’ or ‘Golden Gate’ for the same reasons that the harbor of Byzantium was called Chrysoceras, or Golden Horn.”

Golden Gate Ave
San Francisco, CA

14. Ivy Street

Ivy St, San Francisco, CA

The Hayes Valley convention was to name large central streets after prominent locals and to name smaller byways after botanical themes.

Ivy St
San Francisco, CA

15. Hayes Street

Hayes St, San Francisco, CA

Hayes Street may be named for any of a few members of the wealthy Hayes family, but 19th century politician Samuel Lupton wrote in the San Francisco Call in 1901 that the most likely namesake was Thomas Hayes, who owned much of the land around here in the 19th century, and thus the region was known as Hayes Valley.

Hayes St
San Francisco, CA

16. Fulton Street

Fulton St, San Francisco, CA

Local historian John Freeman says that Fulton Street bears the name of Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamship, making SF one of at least three California cities with streets in his name.

Fulton St
San Francisco, CA

17. Market Street

Market St, San Francisco, CA

Odds are Market Street was named after a street of the same name in Pennsylvania, because the engineer behind the 1847 city survey, Jasper O’Farrell, hailed from there. O’Farrell, of course, ended up with a San Francisco street of his own in due time.

Market St
San Francisco, CA

18. Funston Avenue

Funston Ave, San Francisco, CA

Funston should be 13th Avenue but that would be bad luck, so instead it’s named for Brigadier General Frederick Funston, acting commander of the U.S. Army in the days following the 1906 earthquake and eire.

Funston Ave
San Francisco, CA

19. Haight Street

Haight St, San Francisco, CA

Banker Henry Haight came to San Francisco in 1850 and later served as governor. The Library of Congress credits him with founding the University of California, which means that San Francisco’s counterculture hippie movement found its roots in the street named after maybe the biggest square in the history of the state.

According to the Library of Congress, nearby Ashbury Street, forever linked with Haight in the public eye as well as by an actual intersection, is named for Munroe Ashbury, former member of the Board of Supervisors.

Haight St
San Francisco, CA

20. Terry A. Francois Boulevard

Terry A Francois Blvd, San Francisco, CA 94158

Originally known as China Basin Street, the city renamed it in 1992 after SF’s first black supervisor, who served from 1964 to 1977. Francois previously made his name as a lawyer successfully suing the San Francisco Housing Authority for discriminatory practices.

Terry A Francois Blvd
San Francisco, CA 94158

21. Duboce Avenue

Duboce Ave, San Francisco, CA

Spanish-American war veteran Victor Duboce was elected to the Board of Supervisors in 1899, but served less than a year before dying. Moved by his service, his supporters launched a campaign to name Duboce Park for him, which then shortly spread to the street and entire neighborhood. Sometimes you really can win for losing.

Duboce Ave
San Francisco, CA

22. Irving Street

Irving St, San Francisco, CA 94122

Classic Americana author Washington Irving is today famous almost exclusively for his long stories The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle.

Irving St
San Francisco, CA 94122

23. Judah Street

Judah St, San Francisco, CA 94122

Theodore Judah was chief engineer on the Central Pacific Railroad, although he didn’t always enjoy the degree of fame and acclaim he has today. PBS reports that, in his lifetime, his peers nicknamed him “Crazy Judah” on account of his zeal.

Judah St
San Francisco, CA 94122

24. Potrero Avenue

Potrero Ave, San Francisco, CA

“Potrero” simply means “pasture.” Former alcalde Don Francisco de Haro used to graze his cattle around these parts; most of San Francisco was once a literal cowtown.

Potrero Ave
San Francisco, CA

25. Guerrero Street

Guerrero St, San Francisco, CA

A common Spanish surname, “Guerrero” means “soldier.” In this case the street is named for another alcalde, Francisco Guerrero. In 1851, Guerrero was “murdered by blows to the head” near 12th Street and Mission. His grave can be found at the Mission itself.

Guerrero St
San Francisco, CA

26. Tennessee Street

Tennessee St, San Francisco, CA

Upon California’s admission to the union in 1850, landowners hoped to set off a patriotic land rush in Potrero Hill by naming the streets for other U.S. states. It didn’t work, but the names stuck anyway.

Tennessee St
San Francisco, CA

27. Noe Street

Noe St, San Francisco, CA

Named for alcalde of Yerba Buena Jose de Jesus Noe. Like many SF neighborhoods, Noe Valley once consisted mostly of a rancho deeded to Noe in 1846.

Noe St
San Francisco, CA

28. Twin Peaks Boulevard

Twin Peaks Blvd, San Francisco, CA

According San Francisco Recreation and Parks, the Spanish originally dubbed Twin Peaks “Los Pechos de la Choca”—“the Breasts of the Maiden.”

Twin Peaks Blvd
San Francisco, CA

29. Castro Street

Castro St, San Francisco, CA

General Jose Castro was several-times governor of various parts of California. Other than having his name conferred on many locales, he seems rarely to have caught a break in life. The onetime lawmaker was often arrested and deposed before falling prey to assassination in 1860.

Castro St
San Francisco, CA

30. Elizabeth Street

Elizabeth St, San Francisco, CA

SF Genealogy writes that Noe Valley was once known as Horner’s Addition after landowner James Horner, who bought much of the neighborood from Jose de Jesus Noe in 1853. Horner named Elizabeth Street after his wife, but no street in SF bears his name.

Elizabeth St
San Francisco, CA

31. Ortega Street

Ortega St, San Francisco, CA

José Francisco Ortega scouted for Gaspar de Portola (see Portola Drive) and thus was possibly the first European to see the San Francisco Bay.

Ortega St
San Francisco, CA

32. Cesar Chavez

Cesar Chavez, San Francisco, CA

Until 1995, the street now named for labor leader Cesar Chavez was dubbed Army Street, and some of the signs still bear this moniker beneath the Chavez name. The switch from a short name to a long one meant an enormous bill (just under $1 million) for replacing crucial freeway signage.

Cesar Chavez
San Francisco, CA

33. Martin Avenue

Martin Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110
Google

Named for Martin Ron, land surveyor, immigrant, and Holocaust survivor, whose widow spent 13 years pressing the city on the name change.

Martin Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94110

34. Taraval Street

Taraval, San Francisco, CA 94116

Sigismundo Taraval was a Jesuit missionary who traveled through the Baja region in the early 18th century

Taraval
San Francisco, CA 94116

35. Portola Drive

Portola Dr, San Francisco, CA

San Francisco technically has two streets named for Gaspar de Portola, who founded both San Diego and Monterey during his 18th century expedition through California.

Portola Dr
San Francisco, CA

36. Mission Street

Mission St, San Francisco, CA

No points for guessing that the Mission Street name stems from Mission Dolores. When the Spanish sent Juan Bautista de Anza to scout for a location for the Mission and Presidio he brought along Father Pedro Font, who deemed the nearby creek Arroyo de Los Dolores—“Stream of Our Lady of the Sorrows,” hence nearby Dolores Street.

Mission St
San Francisco, CA

37. Innes Avenue

Innes Ave, San Francisco, CA 94124

Most likely named after 19th century landscape painter George Inness (note the extra “s”). A native of New York, Inness had no particular relationship with San Francisco or California, but his popularity carried him to local honoraries.

Innes Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124

38. Quesada Avenue

Quesada Ave, San Francisco, CA 94124

Jimenez de Quesada was not the luckiest of conquistadors. His disastrous 1569 expedition searching for the fabled lost City of Gold killed all but 80 of his original retinue of 1,800. Quesada himself later died of leprosy.

Quesada Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124

39. Frida Kahlo Way

Frida Kahlo Way, San Francisco, CA 94112

Originally named Phelan Avenue, after the family of a racist 19th century mayor and senator, a citizen committee recommended changing the name to honor 20th century artist Frida Kahlo in 2018.

Frida Kahlo Way
San Francisco, CA 94112

40. Spear Avenue

Spear Ave, San Francisco, CA 94124

Northern-lying Spear Street is named for enterprising Yerba Buena merchant Nathan Spear, who set up business in the Bay Area in the 1830s and then missed out on the Gold Rush on account of his untimely death in 1849. Whether Spear Avenue is also named for the same Spear is less clear, but several other SF luminaries have multiple streets to their name.

Spear Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124

41. Harding Road

Harding Rd, San Francisco, CA 94132

Such a small and obscure street might not normally bear much scrutiny if not for the fact that it’s named after President Warren G. Harding, widely considered one of, if not the worst presidents in U.S. history and notable in this case because he happened to die in San Francisco at the Palace Hotel in 1923.

Harding Rd
San Francisco, CA 94132

42. Excelsior Avenue

Excelsior Ave, San Francisco, CA 94112

Excelsior neighborhood streets are named for foreign nations and cities, such as Moscow, London, and Persia. Excelsior Avenue was once China Avenue, but during the height of anti-Asian xenophobia in the 19th century the city scrubbed the name, along with Japan and India Avenues.

Excelsior Ave
San Francisco, CA 94112

43. Alemany Boulevard

Alemany Blvd, San Francisco, CA

The Roman Catholic Church made Joseph Alemany the first Archbishop of San Francisco in 1853. When first appointed Bishop of Monterey three years earlier Alemany tried to back out of it, simply telling the pope “no.” His holiness clarified in a private audience that the assignment to California was not voluntary.

Alemany Blvd
San Francisco, CA

44. Brotherhood Way

Brotherhood Way, San Francisco, CA 94132

Most likely named for the almost excessive concentration of churches and other houses of worship on this stretch.

Brotherhood Way
San Francisco, CA 94132