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The Hume-Willcutt house, a historic Queen Anne Victorian in Oakland, asks $1.17M

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Originally built for ”a spinster who appears never to have lived in it”

Queen Anne exterior.
Photos courtesy of Daniel Clark of Compass

This pre-quake Queen Anne, a designated Oakland landmark, was built in 1890. Originally intended for Lizzie Hume, who, according to a 1982 city landmark ordinance, was ”a spinster who appears never to have lived in it,” the house was later sold to Joseph L. Willcutt, a well-to-do executive with the Southern Pacific Railroad.

Flash forward more than one century and two major earthquakes later, the still-standing home has landed on the market asking $1,175,000 through Daniel Clark of Compass.

Featuring four bedrooms, two and half bathrooms, and 3,063 square feet, 918 18th Street still bears many of its original architectural details, including staircase banister, light fixtures, stained glass French doors, detailed woodwork, built-ins, and more. (Alas, according to the An Architectural Guidebook to San Francisco and the Bay Area, the Victorian’s “elaborately patterned brick chimney” collapsed down during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.)

The attic loft is especially cool due in large part to the narrow, steep staircase leading up to it. Dig those built-in drawers.

Being a landmark property, the future homeowner would have to be cautious with any renovation plan that might damage the house’s integrity—which is to say, no open-floor remodels, thank you.

The kitchen and bathrooms have been renovated in recent years to provide a contemporary touch. But at least one bathroom keeps an eye on the past, replete with original clawfoot tub and pull-chain toilet.

Foyer with oak staircase still bearing original detailed woodwork.
Gorgeous woodwork up close.
Bay window and nonworking brick fireplace.
Formal dining room with built-ins.
One of four bedrooms.
One of the bathrooms with some of its original details.
Slender staircase leads up to attic space.