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SF may ban tour buses at ‘Full House’ home

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How rude

Next week, the SFMTA Board of Directors will consider the following proposed amendment to the city’s transportation code:

“Amending the Transportation Code, Division II, Section 503 to add Broderick Street between Pine Street and Bush Street on which commercial vehicles with nine or more seats are restricted.”

That seems awfully specific, but at the same time, oddly nondescript. What’s going on over on Broderick Street that the board feels like it has to hold a vote?

The facade of the “Full House” house on Broderick Street.
The “Full House house” in 2016.

Children of the ’90s might have already put two and two together on this one, but for everyone who hasn’t, San Francisco Examiner twigged to the real story here: Broderick between Pine and Bush is where the world famous Full House house sits, and where, it seems, neighbors have found the endless visitations of nostalgic TV fans a neighborhood nuisance.

The house at 1709 Broderick was not actually the site of the cloyingly popular latter-day sitcom, which was shot in a Los Angeles studio. But the show’s frequent establishing shots prominently singled out the circa-1883 Victorian as the supposed home of the fictional but sprawling Tanner clan.

So potent is the TV land allure of the home that in 2016, Full House creator Jeff Franklin bought 1709 Broderick for a little less than $4 million, telling the Hollywood Reporter he was “sentimental about the old house.”

That sentiment has apparently not rubbed off on the entire neighborhood, which has complained about the disruptive flow of tourists to the point that SFMTA is considering the ban.

You can’t outlaw people taking selfies on a public street, of course, but a bus ban may cut down on Broderick congestion.

“Vehicles, including tour buses, continue to park illegally on this block due to limited enforcement resources,” according to an SFMTA staff report.

If only Danny Tanner were around to give them a somber talk about the importance of considerate parking, this could all be avoided.