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Plans for 29-unit building near 17th and Mission reappear

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Old Saitowitz designs and neighborhood dollar store both on the way out

The proposed new building.
Rendering via Natoma Architects

In 2015, the owners of 2100 Mission, a 7,600-square-foot building on the corner of 17th Street, petitioned the Planning Department with plans to turn the site into a 29-unit, six-story mixed-use development, resurrecting a proposal from 2010.

“The proposal would involve the demolition of the existing one-story plus mezzanine [...] industrial building circa 1963,” the application says, which would mean saying goodbye to the neighborhood discount store that presently resides in that storefront.

The new building would have over 2,600 square feet of new retail beneath the housing element, with an estimated $7.5 million construction cost and sleek designs by Natoma Architects and outspoken designer Stanley Saitowitz.

The intersection today.
Google

Nearly two and a half years later, the 17th Street dollar store is still there and the only change to the site comes from sales, but MissionLocal reports that nearby neighbors received notice this week of a community outreach meeting by the developers to discuss plans on July 25.

“‘Please join us for an open house to discuss updated plans to convert 2100 Mission Street into 29 transit-oriented homes and new, community-focused retail space,’” the missives read, according to the site.

Anyone with an opinion can head to the Mission Pool Clubhouse at 19th and Linda streets at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday to speak their mind.

Previously, outspoken Natoma architect Stanley Saitowitz created a striking silvery design for this corner development invoking an almost dystopian use of vertical lines and slats.

“The building is faced with fins which provide a layer of privacy and act as baffles at this busy intersection” the Natoma site says of the design.

But it seems new and more conventional ideas for the look, with alternating banks of recessed and protruding windows, since replaced that one.

The older design.
Natoma Architects