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The Top Ten Most Expensive Homes Currently For Sale in San Francisco

We're going to switch it up this week and try something completely different. Instead of listing the ten least expensive homes for sale in a specific neighborhood, we're going to list the ten most expensive homes for sale in San Francisco. All but one are located in Pacific Heights; a Stanley Saitowitz-designed concrete and steel monster in Cow Hollow made the list. The majority of the list features homes on Pacific, but the most expensive mansions are on Billionaire's Row. As always, we won't include any listing that has a sale that's currently pending. Next week we'll be back to our regular programming of combing through the listing to find you the best scores in one of San Francisco's greatest neighborhoods. Let's get his party started.


10) 2209 Pacific Avenue, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $8,600,000
Size: 3-bed, 7-bath; 5,900-square-feet
Price per square foot: $1,458
The skinny: This circa 1915 Beaux-Arts home was designed by Arthur Brown Jr. If the name sounds familiar, it's because Mr. Brown was also responsible for San Francisco landmarks like City Hall, Coit Tower, and a slew of others. Talk about pedigree. It first hit the market in July of 2011 with an asking price of $9,500,000.


9) 2555 Union Street, Cow Hollow
Asking price: $8,950,000
Size: 4-bed, 3.5-bath; unlisted square footage
Price per square foot: Unavailable
The skinny: San Francisco starchitect Stanley Saitowitz designed this concrete and steel fortress in 2006. It was first listed in late October of 2011 for $9,250,000. What we like most about this home is that it's the only member of the most expensive club that isn't an old mansion. Cheers to new contemporary construction! A real rarity around these parts.

8) 2505 Divisadero Street, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $9,250,000
Size: 8-bed, 8.5-bath; 10,100-square-feet
Price per square foot: $916
The skinny: In 1993 Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett bought this 4-story abode for $2.26 million and remodeled it for his rocker lifestyle. Then in 2009 he sold it for $8,995,000. The current owner has removed all traces of its rocker past, so now it's very regal and has highlights like an "incredible wine cellar" and "2 laundry rooms."

7) 2698 Pacific Avenue, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $9,800,000
Size: 8-bed, 8-bath; 12,667-square-feet
Price per square foot: $774
The skinny: This grand 1906 Beaux Arts-era mansion has been on and off the market since August of 2010. The obvious highlights are the intricate metal-work on the stair railing; delicate frescos on the ceilings; everywhere architectural details. Other highlights include not one but two libraries and a separate butler's pantry.

6) 2799 Pacific Avenue, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $12,500,000
Size: 11-bed, 11.5-bath; 16,474-square-feet
Price per square foot: $759
The skinny: This gigantic home was built in 1894 for Dr. Charles Ellinwood, president of Cooper Medical College. The Colonial Revival mansion is San Francisco Landmark 207. It's history is very rich with drama, and we suggest checking out this Curbed post for the full story. We should point out that 2799 Pacific is bank-owned.

5) 2800 Pacific Avenue, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $12,500,000
Size: 5-bed, 4.5-bath; 8,120-square-feet
Price per square foot: $1,539
The skinny: Yes, we understand that number 6 and 5 have the same price. Let's keep this as simple as possible. Herbst Manor is one of San Francisco's most iconic mansions. The late Lee Herbst Gruhn called it home until she passed away in 2010. The home was built in 1899 by San Francisco hot shot Ernest Coxhead. Property highlights include a mural on the grand staircase that Lee painted of the Palace of Fine Arts, an a dining room with a gold coffered ceiling.

4) 2020 Jackson Street, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $17,500,000
Size: 7-bed, 7.5-bath; 11,500-square-feet
Price per square foot: $1,522
The skinny: Want a tour? The historical Hellman Mansion is the location for the 2012 San Francisco Decorator Showcase that'll be open for tours in May. Designed circa 1902 by Julius Krafft. It once was asking $20,000,000 and now has been knocked down to a much more reasonable price of $17.5M.

3) 2808 Broadway Street, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $25,000,000
Size: 4-bed, 7.5-bath; unlisted square footage
Price per square foot: Unavailable
The skinny: Ah, yes. The first appearance of a property on Billionaire's Row. We aren't entirely sure how long 2808 Broadway's been on the market, but it's at least been asking $25M since February of 2011. There's kitchens (plurals), wet bars (plural), decks (plural), and a slew of other very fancy highlights, including an elevator.

2) 2901 Broadway Street, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $38,000,0000
Size: 8-bed, 7.-5-bath; unlisted square feet
Price per square foot: Unavailable
The skinny: This Italian Renaissance hilltop mansion has quite the sordid past, and most recently has been a victim of terrible graffiti sprayed onto its exterior. This home's been on the and off the market since 2006. It was once asking $55,000,000. It has a decrepit outdoor tennis court, and a "Curio Room" that used to house the original owner's "extensive oological collection." There have been several reports that it's in dire need of repairs. The property's taken several million dollar price chops.

1) 2845 Broadway Street, Pacific Heights
Asking price: $38,500,000
Size: Well, its insides are unfinished so technically there are no bedrooms or bathrooms. It totals 21,888-square-feet
Price per square foot: $1,759
The skinny: That's right, San Francisco's most expensive house isn't even finished. It's described as a "legend in the making," but only because it's supposedly under construction, although we've received several reports that there hasn't been a pinch of movement in many months. The exterior is French limestone. It's owned by Peter Sperling of the Apollo Group and The University of Phoenix. It was originally asking?wait for it? $65,000,000. For a full report check out this archived Curbed post.